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After the Deluge (2003)

 

IMDb

Director: Brendan Maher
Writers: Deborah Cox, Andrew Knight

Awards


David Wenham … Alex Kirby
Hugo Weaving … Martin Kirby
Samuel Johnson … Toby Kirby
Aden Young … Young Cliff
Catherine McClements … Nicki Kirby
Ray Barrett … older Cliff Kirby
Rachel Griffiths … Annie
Essie Davis … Beth
Kate Beahan … Margaret
Vince Colosimo … Eric
Marta Dusseldorp … Eva
Bob Franklin … Sid
Marco Chiappi … Bevan
Simon Burke … Michael
Brian Lipson … Gerry


After the Deluge weaves together the lives of four ordinary men at a critical time in their family history. The patriarch, Cliff (Ray Bennet) is suffering from Alzheimer’s and is reliving his buried memories of WWII. His three sons – Alex, Martin and Toby – reluctantly draw together to care for him.

In attempting to define themselves in a post-feminist world, Cliff’s sons struggle to come to terms with the roles they have played as brothers, sons and men.

Alex (David Wenham – Russian Doll, LOTR), the troubled middle child, is in turmoil with the collapse of a long marriage and the subsequent battle for his children and a new identity. His elder brother Martin (Hugo Weaving), a wild boy musician has eschewed his remarkable musical talent for a now dwindling pop fame. And Toby (Samuel Johnson), their younger brother, the forgotten child, hides in the suburbs too frightened to accept that his ideal of a family will never be realized.

When the war of words quietens, it is music which offers a respite and reconciles the brothers to the loss of a father they could never be good enough for. (from the DVD cover)

About Marty (from the official website):
The eldest son. His hair is beginning to thin. He is a rock musician, a talented guitarist who, after some early success with two big bands finds himself fading into obscurity. Martin has been estranged from his father for twenty years and neither is he close to his brothers. He went wild at a young age – groupies, drugs, and erratic behaviour and though his body pays more for self-abuse these days, he is still going through the same motions. His relationships now last only briefly and involve affairs with women twenty years younger.
In his own way Martin is as unforgiving and rigid as his father. He has given up on the idea of perfection and cut his losses like his father and shares his father’s lack of faith in the prospect of happiness. It takes a challenging friendship with Annie, a woman his own age to force him to reflect on all this and to devote genuine effort to his music at the risk of failure and ridicule. As the friendship develops into romance he has to resist the urge to trample everything and run – because he is not his father and Cliff’s death is to be his final release from that.


Marty: “If you’re gonna spout crap like that, you could at least do it without your clothes on”

Annie: “…she’s too old for you. She’s at least half your age…”

Marty: “I don’t wanna be hired by other 18 year olds.”
Annie: “Why not? You don’t mind going to bed with them.”

Marty: “It’s a meeting of minds.”
Beth: “I’m glad to see you’re over your obsession with legs”

Marty: “what about you, Tobes? Still firing blanks or did you get lucky?”

Marty’s girlfriend: “Did you have hair?”

Marty: “So what’s this about the old man? Is the fucker dead or on his way out?
Alex: “He’s got Alzheimer’s…”
Marty: “So the maestro can’t even control himself. Any particular reason why you’re telling me this?”
Toby: We thought you’d want to know…”
Marty: “Why?”
Alex: “Well, Marty, because he keeps asking for you.”

Annie: “It’s a shame no one your age will have you.”

Annie: “Do you have any habits that aren’t revolting?”
Marty: “None that immediately spring to mind…do you have an opinion on everything?”
Annie: “Just about.”

Marty: “I was never married.”
Annie: “I wonder why…”

Marty: “Is it completely natural what your dog is doing there?”
Annie: “Nothing about that dog is natural.”

Marty: “You have a Lost Boys album?”
Annie: “Oh, don’t get too excited. I used to fancy your drummer.”
Marty: “Oh, you wouldn’t now, believe me…”

Annie: “I guess I would like to know whether it’s my musical taste you’re interested in… or me…”
Marty: “…I…suppose it’s you.”
Annie: “You suppose…?”
Marty: “Yeah…I suppose…I feel comfortable with you…”
Annie: “What…like an old jumper or something?”
Marty: “Yes, like an old torn jumper.”
Annie: “Am I older than any woman you’ve ever been out with?”
Marty: “Oh God…look (coughs) forget about the tape, forget about this conversation?”
Annie: (laughs) “No, I won’t forget it.”

Does this deep soulful stuff usually pull the chicks?”
Marty: “I don’t know, I haven’t tried it before.”

Marty: “What are you doing here?”
Toby: “I bought you a birthday present.”
Marty: “I don’t want it.”
Toby: “It’s a nilex hose fitting. I thought you might like to shove it down your trousers. The other one looks like it’s perished.”

Marty: “She ditched you for a human sleeping pill…[…] It’s not my boat…
Toby: “Terrific, we’ve stolen it…I’m gonna get disbarred…you have no idea how much fun I’m having…”

Marty: “Look, that’s what a happily married man looks like: he’s loved by his wife and ignored by the rest of us.”

Marty: “You played by the rules and you still lost. You don’t have to please anyone anymore…And don’t worry, you’ll never stuff it up as much as me…”

Toby: “Well, I’ll just sit here with you two, drink my beer and wait for that tanker to hit us.”
Alex: “It’s not a bad idea.”
Marty: “You’re still waiting for the old man to pat you on the head. Do you know what? It’s never gonna happen. Not for him, not for you, not for any of us.”

Marty: “Young women are easier…”
(girls) “Oh, yuk…”
Marty: “They don’t expect anything of me, they don’t confuse me, don’t back me into corners, they don’t criticize me…”